1590 Lombardy Rd
Pasadena

Sold

Last listed for $5,300,000, 6 beds, 7 baths, 6830 sq. ft.

Remarks
This grand Monterey Colonial residence was built by legendary architect Reginald Johnson in 1927 for his parents. Johnson, one of the most highly regarded Southern California architects, designed many beautiful homes in Pasadena. Today, the stately six-bed, seven-bath estate near the Huntington Library and Gardens features a large 25,570 square foot flat lot and a wonderful floor plan with both formal and informal spaces for family and entertaining. The welcoming entry with a beautiful wood beam detail leads to the living room which is centered on a fireplace and features wood moulding detail on the walls. French doors from the living room open to a beautiful sun-filled loggia looking out on the lushly landscaped grounds and gardens. The vast patio, centered on a majestic mature olive tree, features a dining area, several seating areas, a barbecue with pull-up seating and an outdoor fireplace. Steps lead down to the pool and jacuzzi with additional seating as well as a sport court. Flanking the pool is a pretty pool house/guest house with vaulted ceilings, a bathroom and a kitchenette. Inside the home, the custom chef’s kitchen is open to a breakfast area and great room for informal family gathering. A carrera marble island, custom cabinetry and stainless steel appliances complete the kitchen area. The formal dining room exudes charm with a fireplace with wainscoting and moulding lending to its architectural pedigree. Off of the living room there is a large, more casual family room with and walk-in bar and adjacent office. A first floor master suite with a bathroom and dressing area are are the end of this wing. There is an additional bedroom and bathroom on this main floor. Upstairs the master bedroom has a fireplace, a sunlit bathroom and walk in closet. On a separate hallway there are three additional bedrooms and a bathroom. This historic estate is a testament to great design, living as beautifully today as it did in 1927.

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